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More great news on power generation May 21, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Areva, Gov. Butch Otter.
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The Idaho Statesman mentions us in a story about President Obama’s increased push for nuclear power. It is worth a read. In addition to nuclear, we welcome the proposed funding for renewable energy as well.

We also join Gov. Otter in applauding the Department of Energy’s approval of a $2 billion loan guarantee for Areva’s proposed uranium enrichment facility in Eastern Idaho.

“DOE’s decision is great news for AREVA and Idaho,” Governor Otter said in the release. “The loan guarantee confirms that Idaho continues to lead the nuclear renaissance in America. The decision also paves the way for new careers and economic recovery across the state.”

It will be a great day when Idaho’s first commercial reactor will be able to make electricity with uranium fuel produced in Idaho.

Best wishes to the Fresno Nuclear Energy Group January 4, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Agriculture, Areva, economic benefits, rural nuclear.
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Our process for building a nuclear reactor is revolutionary – a small, purpose-designed company using investor money – but I am pleased to note others who are willing to try this way of doing it. Large utilities, I believe, are be too unwieldy and indecisive to build a greenfield nuclear plant, leaving smaller, dedicated, investor-funded companies to fill the void.

The Fresno Nuclear Energy Group, launched in December 2006, has recently partnered with Areva to examine the idea of building one or two 1,650 megawatt nuclear plants in Central California. We wish the Fresno group luck – and they will need it, as California state law has banned any new nuclear generation and the state government is a political and financial basket case. Our California counterparts have public opinion in their favor, as at least half of Californians support nuclear energy, according to a recent poll. California has some of the highest energy rates in the nation, which is hurting its economy, and the Fresno group knows that nuclear can provide abundant, reliable low-cost power to attract and keep industries. California currently gets 17 percent of its electricity from its nuclear plants and 55 percent from fossil, including coal and natural gas.

The Fresno group and Areva are taking a cue from our efforts by proposing to use the immense power of a nuclear plant to desalinate water and use it for agriculture, a concept we publicly announced in July 2008 in connection with our efforts in Mexico. We expect they will also propose to use the abundant excess heat from a nuclear reactor to underwrite biofuels production and other initiatives in California’s agriculturally rich Central Valley.